Farro, 1lb

Farro, 1lb

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Farro, a high-protein, high-fiber ancient whole-grain wheat, looks similar to barley, though with a slightly more oblong and larger grain. Like barley, farro retains a notable amount of chew when it gets cooked. Farro and barley can be used interchangeably in most recipes. Along with other grains seeing a revival in modern American kitchens, such as Kamut, kaniwa, and freekeh, farro is considered an ancient grain, which the Oldways Whole Grains Council defines as a grain "largely unchanged over the last several hundred years." This is in contrast to the modern wheat found in most processed grocery-store products, which has undergone genetic manipulation and cross-breeding in an attempt to maximize production and profits. How to Cook Farro In the United States, farro is nearly always sold pearled, which means the bran has been removed so it needs less cooking time than whole farro, which has the bran intact, or semi-pearled farro, which retains some of the bran and is the most common variety found in Italy. Like other grains, farro is easy to cook on the stove, although you might prefer to cook it in a rice cooker or a pressure cooker for convenience. Most producers recommend soaking whole farro overnight to shorten the cooking time. You can skip the overnight soak for pearled and semi-pearled farro, although it's generally still useful to soak it for however long you can, whether that's 30 minutes, an hour, or longer. Cook farro in a 1:2.5 or 1:3 ratio, or 2 1/2 to 3 cups of water or broth for each 1 cup of dry farro. If you soaked the farro overnight, it'll be al dente in about 10 to 15 minutes. If you didn't soak the farro at all, start checking it after about 25 or 30 minutes. You can shorten the cooking time for whole farro without soaking it by cracking it in a spice grinder or food processor first to break open the hard outer shell.